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"A suitable total for the number of citizens cannot be fixed without considering the land..." - Plato, Laws, V


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Footprints of Nations Study:
This report compares the ecological impact of 150 nations, housing over 99 percent of the world's population. Recently updated with 1996 data.
http://www.rprogress.org/programs/sustainability/ef/ef_nations.html

Ecological Footprint Links and Resources
http://www.rprogress.org/programs/sustainability/links.html

If you would like you may order Ecological Footprint directly from
New Society Publishers
http://newsociety.com/

A recent Google search resulted in of thousands of results for terms related to William Mees and Mathis Wackernagel and ecological footprint.

Please send questions and correspondence to Dr. William Rees
Mailing address: School of Community and Regional Planning #433 - 6333 Memorial Road Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z2 Canada
email.wrees@interchange.ubc.ca

Dr. William Rees' profile:
scarp.ubc.ca/people2.asp?name=rees


Biographical information for Dr. William Rees:
William Rees has taught at the University of British Columbia since 1969-70 and is currently Professor in the School of Community and Regional Planning. His teaching and research emphasize the public policy and planning implications of global environmental trends and the necessary ecological conditions for sustainable socioeconomic development. Much of his work is in the realm of ecological economics and human ecology. He is best known in this field for his invention of 'ecological footprint analysis', a quantitative tool that estimates humanity's ecological impact on the ecosphere in terms of appropriated ecosystem (land and water) area. This research reveals the fundamental incompatibility between continued material economic growth and ecological security, and has helped to reopen debate on human carrying capacity as a consideration in sustainable development. Dr. Rees is currently a co-investigator in the 'Global Integrity Project', oriented toward determining the necessary ecological conditions for biodiversity preservation. He has been invited to lecture on his work across Canada and the U.S., as well as in Australia, Austria, China, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Indonesia, Italy, Korea, the former Soviet Union, Spain, Sri Lanka, and Sweden. Dr. Rees was awarded a UBC Killam Research Prize (1996) in acknowledgement of his research achievements.

Publications by Dr. William Rees:
Monetary Analysis: Turning a Blind Eye On Sustainability. (1998) Article and M. Wackernagel. , Ecological Economics (in press). How Should a Parasite Value its Host? (1998) Article Ecological Economics 25:49-52. Consuming the Earth: The Biophysics of Sustainability. (1998) Article Ecological Economics (in press) The Built Environment and the Ecosphere: A Global Perspective. (1998) conference papers Proceedings, Green Building Challenge. Vancouver (26-28 October, 1998 ). Urban Ecosystems: The Human Dimension. (1997) Article Urban Ecosystems 1:63-75. Perceptual and Structural Barriers to Investing in Natural Capital: Economics from an Ecological Footprints Perspective. (1997) Article Wackernagel, M. and.., Ecological Economics 20:1:3-24. Let's Just Assume We're Sustainable. (1997) Article Dollars and Sense (May-June 1997: 38-39). Is 'Sustainable City' an Oxymoron? (1997) Article Local Environment 2:3:303-310. Urban Ecological Footprints: Why Cities Cannot be Sustainable and Why they are Key to Sustainability. (1996) Article Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 1996. Urban Ecological Footprints: Why Cities Cannot be Sustainable (and Why they are a Key to Sustainability). (1996) Article and M. Wackernagel. Environmental Impact Assessment Review 16:223-248. The Footprints of Consumption: Tracking Ecospheric Decline. (1996) Article The Trumpeter. 14:1:2-4. Revisiting Carrying Capacity: Area-Based Indicators of Sustainability (1996) Article . Population and Environment 17:195-215. Our Ecological Footprint: Reducing Human Impact on the Earth. (1996) Book, chapter Wackernagel, M. and..,Gabriola Island, BC and Stony Creek, CT: New Society Publishers. Our Ecological Footprint: Reducing Human Impact on Earth. (1996) Book, chapter William Rees and Mathis Wackernagel. New Society Publishers, 1996. More Jobs, Less Damage: A Framework for Sustainability, Growth and Employment. (1995) Article Alternatives 21:4:24-30. Cumulative Environment Assessment and Global Change. (1995) Article Environmental Impact Assessment Review 15:295-309. Achieving Sustainability: Reform or Transformation? (1995) Article Journal of Planning Literature 9:4:343-361. Trade as the Appropriation of Carrying Capacity, in Growth, Trade, and Environmental Values, (1995) Book, chapter T. Schrecker ed., Sustainability, Growth and Employment (1994) working papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Pressing Global Limits: Trade as the Appropriation of Carrying Capacity (1994) working papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Planning for Sustainable Development: A Resource Book (1990) monographs Centre for Human Settlements Publications Defining "Sustainable Development" (1989) (1989) research bulletins Centre for Human Settlements Publications Ecological Meaning of Environment-Economy Integration (1989) discussion papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Atmospheric Change: Human Ecology in Disequilibrium (1989) discussion papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications The Role of Environmental Assess-ment in Promoting Sustainable Development (1988) discussion papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Sustainable Development and How to Achieve it (1988) discussion papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Implementation of the Norman Wells Project Impact Funding Program (1987) working papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Stable Community Development in the North: Properties and Requirements (1986) working papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Genesis and Structure of the 'Dene Gondie' Study: What People Say about the Norman Wells Project (1986) working papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Government Management Capability: A Brief to the Beaufort Sea Environmental Assessment Panel (1985) working papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Politics, Power and Northern Land Use Planning (1984) working papers Centre for Human Settlements Publications Environmental Assessment of Hydrocarbon Production from the Canadian Beaufort Sea (1984)


If you would like you may order Ecological Footprint directly from
New Society Publishers
http://newsociety.com/

Mathis Wackernagel is credited along with William Mees, with the coining of the term, "Ecological Footprint." Beginners who wish to find out about ecological footprinting should pick up a copy of the classic book, OUR ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT. Dr. Wackernagel has a list of publications as long as your arm, but we just didn't have time to list them here.

Mathis Wackernagel, wackernagel@rprogress.org is coordinator of the Centro de Estudios para la Sustentabilidad at the Universidad Anáhuac de Xalapa in Mexico and Director of the Indicators Program at Redefining Progresshttp://www.rprogress.org based in San Francisco, USA. He has a Ph.D. in community and regional planning from the University of British Columbia in Canada and a mechanical engineering degree from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

Dr. Mathis Wackernagel contact information:
Apdo. Postal 653 91000 Xalapa, Ver., MEXICO tel.: ++52 (28) 14-96-11 fax: ++52 (28) 19-15-15 e-mail: wackernagel@rprogress.org

Ecological Footprints of Nations: How Much Nature Do They Use? -- How Much Nature Do They Have? by Mathis Wackernagel et al.
http://www.ecouncil.ac.cr/rio/focus/report/english/footprint/



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What's the bottom line for biodiversity?
More species extinctions. More habitat destruction. Every day frittered away with these silly calculations in order to get some abstract numerical value. Ersatz concern for species extinctions at best, this colossal waste of time continues and will continue.

habitat loss Who gives a hoot about habitat?
"Who gives a hoot about habitat?"



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J.  Weiner

"The world's footdragging brings many scientists to despair. It exasperates Sherwood Rowland, who sounded the first alarm back in the 1970s. 'After all,' Rowland has said, 'what's the use of having developed a science well enough to make predictions, if in the end all we're willing to do is stand around and wait for them to come true?'"

Jonathan Weiner, The Next One Hundred Years, 1990

hadaka

Ecological destruction is evident. Massive reductions in biodiversity are evident. Everyone ignores the destruction of biodiversity because to do otherwise would require acknowledgement of the cause, human overpopulation.


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